Sensational Snow: 2017’s Beautiful Snow Pack & the Science of Rivers

By: Easton Smith I am no climate scientist, but I do know enough about the climate to couch my enjoyment of it. When the spring comes refreshingly early, it’s spoiled by my knowledge that it’s probably a dangerous premonition of the heat to come. When we get a sunny day in the winter, I am bothered Read More

What is at Stake: A case for the Outdoor Industry

By Lauren Wood: 3rd Generation river-runner with Holiday River Expeditions As I shovel endless fluffy snow, that will soon turn into spring run-off, I know It’s that time of year again: the Outdoor Retailers convention is back in town, in the heart of Salt Lake City. This show takes a full week with thousands working Read More

Stargazing

Starry Eyed: Stargazing Trips Take Another Round

For all of our musings about what’s ‘innate’ in our human personalities and culture, we actually know very little about what human beings have been doing and feeling for the majority of our time on this planet. We don’t have journals from the paleolithic era to tell us how early humans felt about their existential Read More

A Seasonal Soaking: Monsoons in the West

Sometimes it’s the absence of a thing that reveals and sharpens its importance. The lover who is away, the friend who has passed on, these pangs of loss help us to reorganize our lives around the things that matter most to us. Lack reminds us to celebrate the return of abundance. The desert knows this Read More

Taking Shape: The Deposition of a River

Sometimes change occurs in a single, catastrophic swipe of fate or a sudden, glorious moment of victory. More often, we look back to a decade ago and realize, quizzically, that we are a totally different person now. Some mysterious combination of everyday interactions slowly wore upon our old beliefs and habits, and built new layers Read More

One Man’s Trash is Still Trash: Micro-Trash on the River

As Lake Powell’s shoreline recedes, a strange new ecology comes into view. Fishing poles, dropped long ago by drunken uncles and clumsy fathers, stick out from the cracked and flaking mud like weeds. Old beer cans that have worked their way into the sedimentary layers glint in the sun like some strange signal in this Read More

Young KINGs of Climate: How “Keep It in the Ground” is shaping the environmental movement.

We at Holiday can’t be greedy with our talented bloggers. In that vein, Kate Savage, the intrepid writer who has been discussing such curious creatures as lichen, desert varnish, pot-holes and cryptobiotic soil has recently taken a post writing for Grand Canyon Trust. The Trust is a wonderful organization protecting the ‘wild heart of the Read More

Rhapsody on River Foam

  Guides call it ‘beaver vomit,’ the plumes of brown foam along the river. When you first see the lines of froth, you might suspect foul play and pollution. But long-time Holiday guide Lauren Wood reassured me: “This is the good stuff. This is a healthy river.” Lauren’s words, as they often do, cajoled me Read More

What’s Right With Uintah County: In Eight Parts

A market analyst once told me about God’s plan for dirt. He said it’s all well and good to talk about how special land is when I’m in a spectacular red rock national park, like Arches — but, he asserted, “other places God just stuck dirt to keep the earth from falling apart.” This wasn’t Read More

Evil Weeds and Post-apocalyptic Permaculture

Don’t try to tell me tamarisk isn’t pretty. I’ve scratched my skin to ribbons on those ruddy twigs, those blue-green feathers of leaves and plumes of purple dust-flowers. I know beauty when I see it. It’s called Tamarix chinensis, as in China, where it rightfully, geographically, ecologically belongs. But it was brought here because it Read More