A Seasonal Soaking: Monsoons in the West

Sometimes it’s the absence of a thing that reveals and sharpens its importance. The lover who is away, the friend who has passed on, these pangs of loss help us to reorganize our lives around the things that matter most to us. Lack reminds us to celebrate the return of abundance. The desert knows this Read More

Taking Shape: The Deposition of a River

Sometimes change occurs in a single, catastrophic swipe of fate or a sudden, glorious moment of victory. More often, we look back to a decade ago and realize, quizzically, that we are a totally different person now. Some mysterious combination of everyday interactions slowly wore upon our old beliefs and habits, and built new layers Read More

Traveling Solo

Traveling Solo Guests Who Go For It, Despite Not Knowing A Soul on the River…Yet “Live life without regrets.” That has been my simple mantra for several decades now, but not before I already had a muddled collection of “should-would-and-could haves.” Some regrets just bite you in the butt when you’re not looking; you didn’t Read More

Young KINGs of Climate: How “Keep It in the Ground” is shaping the environmental movement.

We at Holiday can’t be greedy with our talented bloggers. In that vein, Kate Savage, the intrepid writer who has been discussing such curious creatures as lichen, desert varnish, pot-holes and cryptobiotic soil has recently taken a post writing for Grand Canyon Trust. The Trust is a wonderful organization protecting the ‘wild heart of the Read More

Lichen Revolutions!

Lichen Revolutions! (plus that lichen users’ guide you’ve always been hoping for) It’s nature’s Jackson Pollock painting on the rocks. It’s finger-print evidence that a giant has been handling the boulders. It’s 1970s design inspiration, in seafoam green and burnt orange, encasing tiny goblets or exploding in fluffy shag.   It’s lichen, and it’s everywhere. Read More

50 Ways to Cut an Onion: 6 decades of River-Rats Celebrate Dee Holladay and Holiday River Expeditions

By: Lauren Wood Ray’s Tavern was bustling with travelers, bikers and river-folk alike on the eve of the Holiday River 50th Anniversary weekend celebration. Like any other day at Ray’s, delicious smells wafted out of the brick building into the remote streets of Green River; acting like a homing beacon for river-guides far and wide. Read More

Watersheds West of the Wasatch

I don’t know how to write this as a happy story. I don’t know how to talk about the Great Salt Lake right now without at least a bit of this heaviness settling into my gut and my chest.   There isn’t anything like it, this bizarre body of water. The Uinta mountains to the Read More

Rhapsody on River Foam

  Guides call it ‘beaver vomit,’ the plumes of brown foam along the river. When you first see the lines of froth, you might suspect foul play and pollution. But long-time Holiday guide Lauren Wood reassured me: “This is the good stuff. This is a healthy river.” Lauren’s words, as they often do, cajoled me Read More

Wild Woman of the Whitewater: the Story of Georgie White

In the Grand Canyon there’s a mean little rapid named Georgie. It’s named for a woman who, in her 70s, could still be found racing full-tilt down the canyon in a leopard-print leotard, a beer in her hand. Georgie White was born in 1911 in Oklahoma, and was actually named Bessie DeRoss. She was born Read More

Hope in the Dark and Hope Behind the Dam: How a water crisis could re-wild a river

In 1963 the gates of Glen Canyon Dam shut, and the waters rose. Over the following 19 years, 186 miles of canyons sank under the water and mud, and with them sank over 4,000 ancient ruins and petroglyphs, and habitat for 79 plant species, 189 bird species, 34 kinds of mammals. But what do the Read More